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Resolution 96-031-CCGRANT COUNTY OFFICE OF BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS POST OFFICE BOX 37 EPHRATA. WASHINGTON 98823 15091 754-2011 BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GRANT COUNTY, WASHINGTON IN THE MATTER OF COUNTY PLANNING RESOLUTION NO. 96-31—CC REGARDING A CONTRACT FOR SERVICES BETWEEN BENTON COUNTY AND CH2MHILL CONSULTING, ON BEHALF OF BENTON, GRANT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTIES. WHEREAS, the Counties of Benton, Grant, and Franklin signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), for the establishment of a cooperative, comprehensive, and integrated planning process for the protection of the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River on December 6, 1995, and WHEREAS, a working partnership consisting of the Planning Directors' from the three counties was formed to coordinate the planning efforts of the Hanford Reach, and WHEREAS, the counties contributed funds to hire a consulting firm to prepare the preliminary planning work for the Hanford Reach Resource Protection Plan, and WHEREAS, the working partnership prepared a "Request for Proposal" that was approved by all three counties and then mailed the Request for Proposal to prepare said Hanford Reach Resource Protection Plan to qualified consulting firms, and WHEREAS, respondent proposals were received by the working partnership and reviewed by the same whereupon the partnership did unanimously select and recommend to the Board of County Commissioners the firm of CH2MHILL to prepare the Hanford Reach Resources Protection Plan, and WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners agrees that the consulting firm of CH2MHILL should be selected and approved for the provision of services related to the preparation of the Hanford Reach Resources Protection Plan as outlined in the Request for Proposal submitted by this firm, and NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of County Commissioners authorize the working partnership to negotiate a contract with CH2MHILL not to exceed $75,000 to be presented to the Benton County Commissioners for approval and signing. Done this 11th day of March , 1996 ATTEST: Q �� �V V Clerk of th and A4 ConuriissionerCommissionV Constituting the Board of County Commissioners of Grant County, Washington . v, °- Thomas W. Halslip, Jr. - Director Applied Sciences CH2M HILL 700 Clearwater Lane P.O. Box 8748 Boise, Idaho 83707 208.345.5310 Engineers Planners Economists Scientists ®- Gene J. Wallace - Area Office Manager CH2M HILL Celebrating 3190 George Washington Way, Suite 8 ,SQ Ye a r s Richland, Washington 99352-1659 509.375.3444 509.375.5566 (FAX) 509.967.2130 (Home) Engineers Planners Economists Scientists USRI6DOB.DOC PROPOSAL Hanford Reach Resource Protection Planning Services Prepared for Benton, Franklin, and Grant Counties FEBRUARY 1996 RFP 96-01 CW HI LL PROPOSAL Hanford Reach Resource Protection Planning Services Prepared for Benton, Franklin, and Grant Counties FEBRUARY 1996 RFP 96-01 CWHILL USRI6DOB.DOC I Contents Section Page Introduction.................................................................................................................................1 ProjectTeam................................................................................................................................5 ProjectUnderstanding............................................................................................................... 7 ProjectApproach........................................................................................................................8 Scopeof Work.............................................................................................................................9 DataInventory................................................................................................................ 9 QualitativeAssessment.................................................................................................. 9 Agency Management and Regulatory Functions.....................................................10 Alternative Frameworks..............................................................................................10 NEPA/SEPA Compliance...........................................................................................11 Draft Actions, Goals, and Policies..............................................................................11 DecisionWorkshop......................................................................................................12 Draft Joint Implementation Ordinance......................................................................12 Public Participation Plan ..............................................................................................12 Document Production Process....................................................................................13 ProjectSchedule........................................................................................................................14 CostSchedule............................................................................................................................16 Appendix A. Resumes Table 1 Hanford Reach Protection Plan Budget.....................................................................17 Figures 1 Organization Chart......................................................................................................... 6 2 Hanford Reach Protection Plan Schedule..................................................................15 USRI6DOB.DOC Introduction CH2M HILL provides consulting services in environmental sciences, engineering, planning, and economics. Our areas of expertise include watershed and stormwater master planning; hydrologic, hydraulic, and water quality modeling; stormwater and surface water sampling; aquatic ecology and wetland studies; laboratory and data analysis; environmental education; and program policy and funding studies. The firm has more than 4,000 professional and support staff distributed among more than 40 offices throughout the country and abroad, including an office in Richland, Washington. Our regional offices enable us to maintain local presence by professionals who are aware of local issues, regulations, and environmental conditions. At the same time, these professionals can tap firmwide resources for specific expertise. We analyze each project and assemble a team of professionals to best meet each project's specific requirements. More than two-thirds of the firm's annual workload involves projects dealing with the development, use, and protection of natural resources. We have helped numerous agencies prepare comprehensive plans, environmental impact statements, and other environmental documents. Many of our clients have been county governments. The following projects exemplify our firm's capabilities to provide services and products to Benton, Grant, and Franklin counties that will facilitate the preparation of a joint Hanford Reach Resources Protection Plan. Columbia River Impact Evaluation Washington State Department of Ecology Pursuant to a consensus order with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), CH2M HILL helped the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) prepare a plan to determine cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, including river sediments, islands, both riverbanks, and associated biota, due to past practices at the Hanford Site. The study extended upstream a sufficient distance to provide appropriate control information for evaluating impacts, including sample locations at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge. The objective of the plan was to evaluate impacts to that portion of the Columbia River and its environs and assess the need for specific characterization efforts to provide information for a risk assessment. CH2M HILL reviewed existing information and performed a preliminary impact evaluation to assess the adequacy of existing data and propose additional or amended data collection activities. USRI6DOB.DOC HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL Synthesis of Ecological Data for the Hanford Reach Washington State Department of Ecology CH2M HILL compiled into a single document Hanford Site -related information pertinent to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities conducted in the Hanford Reach area. That information included complete lists of plant and wildlife species, contamination level data, and feeding and behavioral relationships among major species. CH2M HILL suggested potential indicator species (those that might be used to evaluate future prevailing environmental conditions at the Hanford Site) based on this information. Hanford Site Cultural Resource Assessments U.S. Department of Energy CH2M HILL prepared cultural resource assessments of six reactor areas at the Hanford Site. Because the reactor areas were located right along the Columbia River, they were more likely to be sensitive areas. We compiled existing data and examined areas of disturbance. We then ranked waste sites to relatively determine which sites would be most sensitive and conducted baseline assessments of those sites. In this manner, we were able to help protect Tribal resources by concentrating our analysis efforts on the most sensitive sites. Yakima Training Center Cultural and National Resources Management Plan U.S. Army Corps of Engineers CH2M HILL is working with staff from Yakima Training Center (YTC) and Fort Lewis to develop a state-of-the-art management plan to plan, control, and monitor all training activities at YTC. The plan will use ecosystem management at the landscape level to develop options for protecting the environment during training and restoring it afterwards. This is the one of the first applications of landscape -level ecosystem management at active Army installations. The comprehensive cultural and natural resource management plan (CNRMP) CNRMP will be developed from existing data and information with the opportunity to identify additional data that may be necessary for management of specific resources. We will use our thorough knowledge of the site and its training activities, gained during or preparation of the stationing EIS, to help define resource thresholds. All elements of the environment are being addressed. Special attention is being given to soils and habitat because of the disruptive nature of maneuver training with tracked vehicles in an arid, shrub -steppe environment. Cultural resources are also receiving detailed analysis, and the Cultural and Natural Resource Committee (CNBC) is playing a major role in development of the plan. USRI6DOB.DOC HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL Twin Bridges Replacement Project EIS Benton County, Washington Benton County proposed to use federal bridge replacement funds to replace the existing south span of the Twin Bridges crossing of the Yakima River in West Richland, Washington, to improve safety and accommodate projected traffic demand. Four replacement alternatives were considered in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental impact statement (EIS). The most significant environmental issues addressed in the EIS included the loss of jurisdictional wetlands, the impact on the predicted 100 -year water surface elevation, stormwater runoff and its effects on river water quality, loss of terrestrial wildlife and salmon -spawning habitats, increased noise levels within adjacent residential areas, loss of farmland, and the visual quality impacts of a new bridge. CH2M HILL coordinated all relevant activities with Benton County, the Washington State Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration, and other agencies in regards to review and publication of the draft EIS. In addition, CH2M HILL assumed a leading role in the organization and conduct of public and agency scoping meetings and the draft EIS public hearing. Columbia Basin Project Expansion EIS U.S. Bureau Of Reclamation CH2M HILL completed a draft EIS and supplemental draft EIS (SDEIS) for this project. The primary goal of this project was to irrigate 539,000 acres of the Columbia Basin. The supplement to the draft EIS was prepared to assess the impacts of the Anadromous Fish Plan, a plan proposed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation as mitigation of potential impacts on Columbia River fisheries as a result of withdrawals from the Columbia River for irrigation purposes. Survival of anadromous salmonids will be enhanced by providing up to 1.6 million acre-feet of water in drier years during the juvenile downstream migration period. The fisheries assessment included an evaluation of changes in river flows and reservoir elevations, effects on fish survival from mitigation flow regime, and effects on spawning and incubation flows in Hanford Reach. A major aspect of the SDEIS analysis focused on altered lake drawdown and retention times at Lake Roosevelt and Libby and Hungry Horse Reservoirs and what effect these compatible use zones will experience in the areas of zooplankton production and fish reproductive success. Steel Mill Permitting Nucor Inc. Nucor retained CH2M HILL's Portland office to assist in obtaining permits for its proposed steel mill at Port Westward, Oregon, a former U.S. Army ship loading facility for munitions on the Columbia River, about 30 miles downriver from Portland. After about 6 months of investigations, Nucor halted the project because of market and financial issues. USRI6DOB.DOC HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL During the 6 -month period, CH2M HILL scoped out and coordinated the work of a wetlands subconsultant who was delineating wetlands on the site and preparing a mitigation plan. We performed a Level I site assessment for potential contamination and scoped out the work for a Level II assessment in certain parts of the site. We performed an archaeological investigation of suspected Native American sites and advised Nucor on dealing with them. We investigated fisheries and endangered species issues and advised Nucor on how to handle them during later permitting stages. We prepared amendments to the county's comprehensive plan and ordinances to allow the facility to be built, in coordination with Nucor's land use attorney. We prepared a detailed project description for insertion in the environmental impact statement, which we had started to prepare for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Public Involvement and Conflict Management Training U.S. Bureau of Reclamation CH2M HILL was retained by the Bureau of Reclamation to develop public involvement and conflict management training courses for Bureau staff throughout the western states who are dealing with extremely complex and controversial water resource management issues. The first phase of the work involved preparing a 4 -day session and resource notebook on basic public involvement philosophy and techniques, including skill -building modules on public involvement planning, active listening, value identification, meeting strategy, development and delivery of presentations, meeting facilitation, and media management. The session was pilot -tested with Reclamation staff in Denver, Colorado, revised, and delivered in the Mid -Pacific Region in Sacramento, California. The course will become part of Reclamation's core training program to be offered regularly in each region. Regional Needs Assessment King County, Washington CH2M HILL was contracted to help King County identify and implement an optimal system for delivering stormwater services in the unincorporated areas and 35 cities in the county. The unincorporated suburban portions of King County have been reduced and fragmented by many recent incorporations and annexations, which not only reduced the revenues available to the county, but also raised significant questions about the efficiency of providing services and managing regional resources such as water quality, salmon, and flooding. This project identified and compared institutional structures and capabilities and physical resources throughout the county. CH2M HILL helped conduct a major participatory decision process at multiple levels (public, managers, and elected officials). USRI6DOB.DOC Project Team CH2M HILL has assembled a highly qualified team to conduct this project. We have kept the team small to maximize cost-effectiveness and efficiency. Figure 1 shows our proposed project organization. The team will be led by Bill Blosser, a highly experienced land use and environmental planner. Bill has conducted numerous land use studies for CH2M HILL and has served as chairman of Oregon's Land, Conservation, and Development Commission and the Water Resources Commission. Through this experience, Bill has gained an in-depth knowledge of the comprehensive planning process and expertise in public involvement. Tom Haislip will assist Bill and will serve as natural resources manager. Tom has more than 20 years of experience in leading natural resource planning projects, agency coordination and negotiations, and public involvement. Gene Wallace will advise the team on local issues. Gene is the manager of CH2M HILL's Richland office. The proposed technical staff includes biologists, cultural resource specialists, and planners with direct experience at the Hanford Reach. Roger Ovink and Dick Moos are fisheries biologists currently conducting anadromous salmonid studies of the Hanford Reach. Similarly, Jim Bard and Darby Stapp are leading cultural resource studies of the Hanford Reservation and Reach. Bob Swope is a land use and natural resource planner who recently managed the Twin Bridges environmental impact statement for the Benton County Planning Department. Detailed resumes for these proposed staff are presented in Appendix A. USRI6DOB.DOC Biological Roger Ovink Dick Moos Mi USR16DOB.DOC Benton, Franldin, and Grant Counties Boards of Commission . ............. ..... . . . . . Wokng Partnership Staff Bill Blosser Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Technical Staff Resources Cultural Jim Bard Darby xt HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL Citizens Adhisory Panel NUN, Planning �,- 0 �6' I N•- � Gene Wallace Senior Advisor Figure 1 Organization Chart Project Understanding The reach of the Columbia River between Priest Rapid Dam and the upper end of the McNary Pool is one of the river's last remaining free-flowing sections. Because of this unique characteristic, governmental agencies and the public have developed much interest in how to manage and protect the reach. One significant proposal is to classify the 51 -mile reach under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act with the federal government assuming management. However, local interests (that is, Benton, Grant and Franklin county commissioners) believe the reach can and should be managed under local land use rules and existing authorities. To this end the boards of commissioners of Benton, Grant and Franklin counties have entered into a memorandum of agreement (MOA) concerning a process to develop the Hanford Reach Resources Protection Plan. This plan will become part of each county's comprehensive plan, and joint implementing ordinances will be developed. The counties have formed a working partnership to develop the plan and implementing ordinances and are appointing an advisory panel to assist in the effort. This proposal responds to the partnership's request for proposals (RFP) to assist in its efforts. The partnership intends to retain a consultant to help perform the following basic tasks: 1. Inventory existing information about the reach and the goals of management programs 2. Describe existing management relationships and authorities within the Hanford Reach, including land ownership 3. Explore alternative ways to protect and administer protection of the reach, including alternative ways to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) 4. With input from the public and all interested parties, draft a set of actions, goals, and policies for a protection plan 5. Prepare a draft joint implementation ordinance or memorandum of understanding for the partnership to use to implement a protection plan The partnership recognizes that complex legal issues related to the Hanford Reservation and private property issues pertain to the above tasks and sees the consultant's work as a point of departure for further negotiations with interested parties to resolve outstanding issues. The partnership strongly believes that it can adequately protect the reach by using existing available authorities, thereby avoiding the cost, bureaucracy, and political turmoil involved in creating a National Wild and Scenic River. USRI6DOB.DOC Project Approach CH2M HILL proposes to organize its activities according to the deliverables described in the RFP and MOA. Our goal is to work in concert with representatives from Grant and Franklin counties as part of a team directed by the Benton County Planning Department staff. The work will consist of the following phases: • Data -gathering • Analysis of problems and responsibilities • Development of alternative solutions • Presentation of findings and receipt of public input • Submittal of documents to be used by the working partnership to prepare the protection plan and implementation ordinances Subsequent to this project, the county boards of commissioners will adopt a plan and ordinances to implement the process to integrate and coordinate the management and protection of the reach. USRI6DOB.DOC Scope of Work Data Inventory The first step in the project will be to review existing data in county files and assemble additional data on archaeology and cultural resources and anadromous fisheries. The review and additional data gathering will focus on lands within 1/4 mile of the high-water line, but will also include the river, islands, and upland areas (such as White Bluffs) where important sources of influence may extend beyond 1/ mile. CH2M HILL will review the following resources: • Biological resources • Special status species • Archaeological and cultural resources • Recreational use and facilities • Significant physical processes (for example, erosion and landslides) • Transmission corridors • Transportation corridors • Irrigation facilities • Hazardous materials cleanup activities • Other infrastructure The source of these data will be county records, which contain information from Hanford contractors and state and federal agencies. In addition, we will use data collected by CH2M HILL on archaeological and cultural resources and anadromous fisheries. Key staff assignments: Tom Haislip, Darby Stapp, Roger Ovink, Bob Swope, Jim Bard, and Dick Moos. Deliverables: Draft and final technical memorandums on each technical study. These reports will focus on maps that the county can use in its geographic information system (GIS). We will describe archaeological and cultural resources information on the basis of sensitivity levels to match the counties' existing database. Sufficient text will be provided to generally describe the resources and introduce the maps. Qualitative Assessment The quality assessment task will involve an analysis of the data collected during the inventory and in the regulatory function assessment task (see below). CH2M HILL will assess the following • Status of resources • Trends regarding future status • Existing and emerging problems and conflicts • Programs designed to resolve issues • Goals of these programs USRI6DOB.DOC HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL • Progress being made to meet those goals A significant aspect of this task is describing the goals and programs, the level of achievement of those goals, and potential conflicts between them. CH2M HILL will focus on those goals that substantially affect the resources of the Hanford Reach. In addition, we will restrict our efforts to the goals and programs of local, tribal, state, and federal agencies. We assume that goals of other entities (for example, environmental groups or developers) will be dealt with during public meetings or the subsequent protection plan process. Key staff assignments: Tom Haislip, Roger Ovink, Bob Swope, and Darby Stapp. Deliverables: We will deliver this work in two parts. We will include the analysis of the status of resources in the individual technical memorandums prepared for the data inventory task. We will provide the analysis of program goals and potential conflicts in separate draft and final technical memorandums. Each assessment will be qualitative, and graphics and tables will be used where possible. Agency Management and Regulatory Functions The agency management and regulatory function assessment task is critical to the development of the protection plan. CH2M HILL will begin by listing the local, tribal, state, and federal agencies responsible for the resources identified in the data inventory task. We assume that 12 to 14 agencies will be listed, and we will solicit the concurrence of the county's project manager as to the completeness of the list. We will then contact each agency listed to determine the following information: • Extent of land ownership • Responsibility for operation, regulation, enforcement, programs, and monitoring • Mechanisms used or available for integration with other agencies • Extent of sharing and overlapping of responsibilities We will present this information in graphs and tables designed to compare and contrast each agency's responsibilities whenever possible. We will identify land ownership by management agency and private owners (individual owners will not be listed) and display the information on maps that can be used by the counties in their GIS systems. Key staff assignments: Bill Blosser and Tom Haislip. Deliverables: Draft and final technical memorandums. Alternative Frameworks The objective of the alternative frameworks task will be to use the information generated in the preceding tasks to produce alternative approaches to implementing the protection plan process. The purpose of each approach produced will be to describe a framework for how the integration and coordination of management and protection of the Hanford Reach could occur. A minimum of three management scenarios will be produced. Each alternative will maximize the use of existing responsibilities and integration mechanisms, which are likely to have the greatest chance of success, and will include use of a local advisory panel as well as a public involvement program. These alternatives need to be easily implemented and USRI6DOB.DOC 10 HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL require minimal change in policy or authorization to be useful. However, the controversial nature of the management of the reach clearly calls for ample agency interaction and a public involvement process as part of plan implementation. We will prepare a report describing each alternative. In addition, we will present a comparison table of the alternatives and an analysis of the benefits and disadvantages of each alternative. Key staff assignments: Bill Blosser, Tom Haislip, Bob Swope, and Gene Wallace. Deliverables: Draft and final alternatives memorandums. NEPA/SEPA Compliance The NEPA/SEPA compliance task will assess the need for compliance with federal and state environmental policy acts. Although NEPA action clearly would be invoked if the U.S. Department of Energy transferred part or all of the reach to Benton, Grant or Franklin counties, it is unclear at this time what other actions might trigger NEPA. However, incorporation of the protection plan into the comprehensive plans of Benton, Grant and Franklin counties will require SEPA compliance. This task will consider the fact that Benton County is currently developing a land use plan for the Hanford Reservation that will require a SEPA process for adoption and will examine the potential to combine these activities into a single SEPA process. The task will include development of at least two potential NEPA/SEPA processes with separate schedules and descriptions of the benefits and drawbacks to each process. Key staff assignments: This task will be conducted by the Working Partnership. Draft Actions, Goals, and Policies The draft actions, goals, and policies task incorporates the following activities: • Development of conceptual actions, goals, and policies • Presentation of findings and receipt of input at a public meeting • Preparation of draft actions, goals, and policies based on input from the public meeting CH2M HILL will develop conceptual policies and goals from information obtained during the qualitative assessment and agency management and regulatory functions tasks. We will review each county's comprehensive plan to assess existing policies and their potential use for the protection plan. The draft goals will reflect the goals and programs of each agency, but may require compromises where goals conflict. The draft actions will come from implementation strategies developed in the alternative frameworks task. The public meeting program is described below under the public participation plan task. We expect that the conceptual actions, goals, and policies will provide a starting point for discussion in the public meetings. We will use the input received from the public meetings to prepare a more formal draft set of actions, goals, and policies, which we will present in a report. As discussed earlier, the products generated by these tasks will form the basis of the protection plan prepared by the working partnership for consideration by the county boards of commissioners. USRI6DOB.DOC 11 HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL Key staff assignments: Tom Haislip and Bill Blosser. Deliverables: Draft and final actions memorandums. A conceptual approach will be produced prior to the public hearings; the draft memorandum will be prepared within 2 weeks after the public meeting and will be submitted to the workshop (see the decision workshop task below). A final actions memorandum will be prepared after the workshop. Decision Workshop Once the preceding tasks are completed, we recommend convening a 1 -day workshop of the County Boards of Commissioners, Citizens Advisory Panel, and Working Partnership staff for the following purposes: To discuss the findings To agree (to the maximum extent possible) on a single set of goals and policies To determine which of the alternative frameworks for protection and administration and the alternative NEPA/SEPA processes makes the most sense At the conclusion of the workshop, CH2M HILL will prepare a draft final report summarizing information gathered in the study. Key staff assignments: Tom Haislip and Bill Blosser. Deliverables: Draft and final reports. Draft Joint Implementation Ordinance As described in the counties' memorandum of understanding, the joint implementing ordinance consists of land use classifications and performance standards. CH2M HILL's experience is that preparing legally sufficient documents of this sort requires the close involvement of county staff and may require several hearings before planning commissions and county commissioners. We believe that the best course of action for this study is for the consultant to prepare suggested ordinance provisions based on Protection of Critical Areas and Resources and shorelines management provisions, that the county staff can carry through to completion. Suggested ordinances will also be consistent to the extent possible with the existing ordinances of Benton, Grant and Franklin Counties. Key staff assignments: Tom Haislip and Bill Blosser. Deliverables: Draft implementation ordinance concepts. Public Participation Plan The partnership intends to solicit the input of the general public and interested parties during formulation of its protection plan. This type of input can be useful at several stages of the process, but is most useful in developing the draft actions, goals, and policies for the protection plan. CH2M HILL proposes to obtain public input in the following three ways: 1. Mailings. Although the RFP did not specifically request mailings, we believe the process will work more smoothly and economically if part of the public participation USRI6DOB.DOC 12 HANFORD REACH RESOURCE PROTECTION PLANNING SERVICES PROPOSAL process is conducted by mail. We propose to develop a mailing list of interested parties based on similar lists that the U.S. Department of Energy and the counties already have. We anticipate that this list will have 100-150 names. At the start of the project, we will mail an announcement to the parties listed telling them about the project and indicating how they can be involved. We will mail them draft copies of and ask for written comments on the alternative frameworks for protection and administration technical memorandum and the NEPA/SEPA compliance options technical memorandum. We also will mail them a copy of the conceptual set of actions, goals, and policies and request their written or oral testimony on them. 2. Copies of draft technical reports will be sent to members of the Citizens Advisory Panel at the time they are sent to the Working Partnership staff. A series of three meetings will be held with the panel and the staff to receive comments and the reports and their proposed direction. These meetings will be in addition to the decision workshop. It is expected a fourth meeting will be held between the panel and the staff (but not CH2M HILL) on the draft implementation ordinances. Public meetings. We will hold a public meeting in each county to receive oral (or written) comments on the draft set of actions, goals, and policies. These meetings will be open to the general public as well as the parties on the mailing list. We will leave the record open for a week after the meetings for people to mail in further comments and suggestions. We anticipate each meeting lasting about 3-4 hours. We will arrange to conduct meetings during the evenings. 4. Media involvement. CH2M HILL will provide the same materials to the media as we provide to the interest groups and general public, and we will invite the media to the public meetings. Document Production Process CH2M HILL proposes that for each technical memorandum described above, we prepare a draft and final version. We will provide the draft memorandum to the partnership for review in accordance with the project schedule provided in the next section. We suggest 2 weeks for review, after which we will prepare a final version within 1 week. The exception to this procedure is the actions, goals, and policies memorandum. We propose that this memorandum go through three drafts and that we prepare the final version after the decision workshop. We will present a final report incorporating all previously prepared technical memorandums at the same time that we present the draft implementation ordinance. We envision the final report as considerably briefer and less technical than the technical memorandums and capable of being used for general public distribution. We will submit the final report, including the proposed implementation ordinance, for review and revision in the same manner as the technical memorandums. We will provide 15 copies of each technical memorandum and the draft final report, 30 copies of the final report, and one camera-ready copy of each report. USRI6DOB.DOC 13 Project Schedule CH2M HILL proposes to begin work by mid-March, assuming that consultant selection and contracting occur in early March. We believe ample time is available to complete the project by November 15, 1996. To maximize efficiency, we propose to complete the work in as short a time as possible. Figure 2 shows our proposed project schedule, which indicates that the project could be completed by the end of August. This schedule assumes rapid turnaround of draft products. We can make adjustments to this schedule, if desired. USRI6DOB.DOC 14 Table 2. Hanford Reach Protection Plan Schedule ID Task Name ry.. —1_ __ _m_arc_n_ w m 1 may I _u r e I v_ J _w_uqusr x lemcer J—_L Duration 2/78 12/251 3/3 1 3/101 3/17 --3/-24-13131 40 .14 4/21 428 5/5 I W12 1 5/191 5/261 6/2 1 6/9 1 6/161 623 I6/301 7/7 7/14 7/21 7/28 8/4 8/11 Le/76 8/25 9/1 9/8 _9/15 L/22 _9/291 lab 16113110/20 1a27 1 InvivilinV 70d 2 Ihalt 1erh Memo Id .4/19 3 final Tech Men. Id .♦ 6/3 4 Qualitative Assessment 20d 5 Dmft Tech Memo Id ♦ 426 6 Finat Tech Memo 1d '♦ 7 Agency Management and Rec 30d 8 Draft Tech Memo id ♦426 9 Advisory Panel Meeting td ♦ SI15 10 Finat Tech Memo 1d ;♦6l3 11 Alternative Frameworks 20d 12 Draft Tech Memo Id ♦ S24 € 13 Ad—Ory Panel Meeting id ♦ 6/19 14 Final Tech Memo lel ♦ 7/8 15 Draft Action, Goals and Policii 15d 16 Conceptual Tech Memo 15d . 7/15 17 Advisory Panel Meeting td ` ♦ 724 18 Draft Tech Memo 18d 19 Rnal Tech Memo-- _--— 15d ♦ 9/16 20 Public Meetings 3d ■ 21 Decision Workshop 1d . 827 22 Draft Joint Implementation Ori I0d 23 Summary Report 19d 24 DmIt Report 1d ♦ 9/30 25 Final Report Id . 10 Protect Hanford Reach I Task C=°""f '':"'�"j — Milestone Date 3896 Cost Schedule Our cost schedule showing cost projections for completing the documents described is presented in Table 1. USRI6DOB.DOC 16 APPENDIX A Resumes USRI6DOB.DOC James C. Bard Cultural Resource Manager Distinguishing Qualifications Founded, owned and managed a cultural resource management consulting firm in the San Francisco Bay Area • 25 years of archaeological experience in the western United States • Managed cultural resource program for Pacific Gas Transmission Company's Medford and Coyote Springs Extensions Project Relevant Experience Dr. Bard directs cultural resource management projects for CH2M HILL. He has extensive experience in prehistoric archaeology, cultural resource management, and small business management. He has been extensively involved in the management of cultural resource investigations in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Historic Preservation Act, and a variety of other federal cultural resource regulations. Dr. Bard is a cultural resource management specialist with a broad technical and geographical background in all aspects of cultural resource assessment and regulatory compliance. He has 16 years of professional experience in the design and management of cultural resource components of EAs, EIRs, and EISs for federal, state, and municipal agencies, private industry, the military, and the scientific community. His specialties include program management, coordination of technical analyses, research design formulation, Section 106 compliance, Native American and general client liaison, human resources management, and marketing. Dr. Bard was project manager for the cultural resource program for Pacific Gas Transmission Company's Pacific Northwest Expansion Project in Oregon. This multiyear project requires compliance with a number of federal and state cultural resource laws and regulations. The cultural resource program requires the coordination and management of a team of subconsultant specialists in archaeology, history, ethnology, ethnohistory, and other related disciplines; and coordination and liaison with federal and state agencies and Native American tribal groups. The program will include archaeological survey, testing, and data recovery operations, and implementation of a Native American participation program. For Willdan Associates and the Madera County Planning Department, Dr. Bard served as principal investigator for the preparation of a cultural resources assessment and archaeological sample inventory of the Rio Mesa Master Plan Area and Environmental Impact Report, Friant, Madera County, California. He also was principal investigator for the preparation of a cultural resources assessment of the Bellevue Ranch Environmental Impact Report, Merced County, California, for Willdan Associates and the City of Merced Planning Department. Dr. Bard was principal investigator for the cultural resource evaluation for the environmental assessment of the Golden Gate Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project, San Francisco USRI6DOB.DOC A-1 and Marin Counties, California, for T.Y. Lin International and the Golden Gate Bridge District. For the Sacramento District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Dr. Bard was principal investigator for the cultural resources survey and National Register evaluation of the Guadalupe River Project, City of San Jose, Santa Clara County, California. He was also principal investigator for a large-scale site testing program in Pleasanton, California, which used experimental data recovery techniques and involved extensive public and Native American participation. Dr. Bard served as the senior archaeologist for the KVA-Starbuck Gas -Fired Generating Plant Project in Columbia County, Washington, where he conducted a 120 -acre survey of the plant site and assisted in scoping tribal consultations regarding traditional cultural properties. He served as CH2M HILL'S principal investigator and project manager for several projects at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, for Batelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Dr. Bard directed a 685 -acre cultural resource inventory and was lead author of the technical report. He directed an inventory of cultural features at the former Central Shops Complex and five antiaircraft installations that protected the Hanford Site and authored or coauthored two historic context statements for Hanford's National Register multiple property nomination document. Education Ph.D., Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley M.A., Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley B.A., Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley Professional Registrations Society for California Archaeology, Approved Consultant Society of Professional Archaeologists (SOPA) USRI6DOB.DOC A-2 William R. Blosser Senior Environmental and Land Use Planner Distinguishing Qualifications 0 25 years of experience in comprehensive land use and environmental planning, with a focus on resolving complex, multi -interest resource management issues • 12 years of service as chair of the State of Oregon Water Resources Commission and the Land Conservation and Development Commission, which brings an intimate knowledge of resource management issues from the public and private perspectives • Experience in drafting land use and comprehensive planning documents and ordinances • Manages CH2M HILL'S overall resource consulting practice on the Columbia River and served as a governor's appointee to Congress's 180 -day Columbia River governance review Relevant Experience Mr. Blosser is the senior environmental planner in the firm's Portland regional office. His experience includes managing large, interdisciplinary projects involving environmental impacts, land use planning, industrial development, transportation planning, and energy facilities. Mr. Blosser managed permitting studies for an expansion of the Union Pacific Railroad line in the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon, including the development of one of the most extensive cumulative impacts statements ever prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The project involves an approximately 150 -mile rail corridor with 20 different double -tracking projects costing an estimated $120 million. In addition to preparing overall environmental documentation, he supervised preparation of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Section 404 permits for individual projects. The project involves determining the cumulative impacts of the railroad's presence in these areas, determining direct and indirect impacts of the new construction, determining appropriate mitigations for significant cumulative impacts and direct project impacts, and, in cooperation with the tribes and the state and federal agencies, setting allowable levels of impact within the Meacham, Grande Ronde and Powder river basins. The railroad has established a trust fund to restore specific watersheds where railroad impacts have been significant. Mr. Blosser served for 6 years as chairman of the State of Oregon Water Resources Commission and 2 years on the Western States Water Council. In these capacities, he participated in the development of policy, legislation, and administrative rules dealing with water conservation, in -stream flows, riparian protection, basin planning, watershed protection and enhancement, and reserve rights. As chairman of the commission, he oversaw policy development in water conservation, in -stream flows, basin planning, and municipal water supplies; he was extensively involved in water rights issues in Oregon as well. He represented the commission before the Oregon State Legislature, developed and negotiated legislation, and helped write rules based on legislation in addition to conducting commission meetings and public hearings. On the Western States Water Council, USR 16DOB.DOC A-3 Mr. Blosser worked with the senior staff of 12 western states' water commissions on issues of mutual concern, especially relating to federal -state relationships. Mr. Blosser was project manager for a countywide 50 -year water supply and conservation plan for Coos County, Oregon. The plan provides for domestic, industrial, and agricultural water needs and balances those needs with in -stream needs for recreation, aesthetics, and fisheries. He was appointed by the governor as a representative of the State of Oregon to the workshops established in February 1995 to develop new models of governance for the Columbia River system. As chairman of the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission (1990 - present), Mr. Blosser assisted with the development of policy and rules relating to transportation planning, farm and forest land management, rural unincorporated communities planning, and urban expansion; helped develop a consensus process to build agreement on rural development issues; represented the commission before the Oregon State Legislature and developed and negotiated legislation; and conducted commission meetings and public hearings. He also assisted with the development of policies and rules related to coordinated processing of controversial projects in the state and to the management of growth in urban areas. He managed the commission's work that led to the adoption of statewide transportation planning administrative rules. As chairman of the State Agency Council on Growth in the Portland metropolitan area, Mr. Blosser helped develop a coordinated policy for state agencies related to growth issues in metropolitan Portland; policy changes in individual agencies for dealing with growth; and an intergovernmental agreement related to light-rail transit stations. For the City of Dundee, Oregon, Mr. Blosser completed the first comprehensive plan for a city in the Willamette Valley. The plan received acknowledgment under Oregon's 1973 land use planning law. He was also responsible for the comprehensive plan for the City of Fairview, Oregon, and completed a master plan for the downtown area of the City of Tualatin, Oregon, which resulted in the rerouting of a major arterial through the downtown area. He managed the North Riverbank Urban Design Plan for the City of Spokane, Washington, and the Central Eastside Industrial Revitalization Plan for the City of Portland, Oregon. These two projects involved studies to renew aging industrial areas next to central cities. Education Master of Regional Planning, Housing Economics, and Social Policy Planning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill B.A., History, Political Science, Social Psychology, Honors Humanities, Stanford University Public Sector Housing Policy Seminar, University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School USRI6DOB.DOC A-4 Thomas W. Haislip, Jr. Environmental Scientist Distinguishing Qualifications • Experience in managing environmental impact statements and assessments • Knowledge of state and federal environmental and permitting regulations • Knowledge of natural resource issues and resolutions Relevant Experience Mr. Haislip is an experienced manager of projects involving environmental assessment or monitoring for industrial, governmental, and utility clients. His experience includes field data collection, technical analysis, impact assessment, development of mitigation measures, report preparation, and negotiation with regulatory agencies. He has worked on license applications for hydroelectric power plants, monitoring programs for coal and nuclear power plants, irrigation development projects, forest management, mining permits and permit inventories, industrial developments, and corridor studies for pipelines and transmission lines. Mr. Haislip has worked extensively with clients, regulatory agencies, and public interest groups to find alternatives for implementing environmentally sensitive projects that meet the needs of multiple parties and comply with the National Environmental Policy Act. In addition to assessing impacts, he has directed the development of mitigation and enhancement plans, conducted private negotiations, led public involvement meetings, and served as an expert witness on many projects. From this experience he has developed a broad understanding of environmental issues, interest group motivations, institutional and political pressures, and problem -solving methodologies. Mr. Haislip was the manager of the Uintah Basin Replacement Project environmental impact statement (EIS) in Utah. He was responsible for coordinating a large multi- disciplinary team of scientists, engineers, and planners studying the potential effects of a wide-ranging water resource system of storage dams, diversion structures, canals, pipelines, and environmental enhancements. His duties also included working with an external planning team of irrigators, agencies, and environmental groups. He participated in an extensive public involvement program to provide information to and solicit input from diverse stakeholders. For Boise Cascade, Mr. Haislip was senior consultant for monitoring and providing input to the Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project being conducted by the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management. He reviewed the process and products of the project's scientific assessment and two EISs. He also led a team of technical advisors to provide expert input to the government program. Mr. Haislip managed several large, multidisciplinary EIS projects for various governmental agencies, including the Central Utah Project, the Columbia River Basin, and San Xavier Irrigation Development EISs for the Central Utah Water Conservancy District and the U.S. USRI6DOB.DOC A-5 Bureau of Reclamation. In addition, he managed the Orchard Training Area Environmental Management and Analysis Program for the Idaho National Guard, the Hells Canyon Environmental Investigation for the Bonneville Power Administration, and the Logan Canyon Highway EIS for the Utah Department of Transportation. For industry and other private clients, Mr. Haislip participated in environmental assessments (EAs) or EISs for the Twin Falls Canal Rehabilitation for the Twin Falls Canal Company, the Eastside Forest Ecosystem Management Program for Boise Cascade Corporation, Stone Cabin Mine for NERCO, Smokey Canyon for J. R. Simplot Company, and Desert Peak Nevada for Phillips Petroleum. Mr. Haislip directed the preparation of environmental documents for more than 30 hydroelectric projects throughout the West, including Idaho, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Arizona, Montana, Colorado, Wyoming, and California. The documents include feasibility studies, exemption and license applications for both minor and major projects, and applications for relicensing. He has extensive working knowledge of federal and state regulations for such projects and the procedures required to successfully obtain the needed approvals. Mr. Haislip has prepared applications for gas and oil pipelines. Some of these include the WyCal gas pipeline (Wyoming to California), the Uinta Basin gas pipeline (Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming), the Northern Tier oil pipeline in Washington, the Burrows Bay oil pipeline and harbor in Washington, and gas field development in the Canadian Arctic. For the Trojan and Pebble Springs Nuclear Plants and Broadman Coal -Fired Plant, all in Oregon, Mr. Haislip was responsible for terrestrial monitoring programs. In that capacity, he helped design and implement field studies, analyze field data, and prepare annual reports. The studies included monitoring of vegetation, birds, mammals, reptiles, insects, and soil. As part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetland Inventory, Mr. Haislip managed a program to develop a computerized evaluation system for wetlands. On another project for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, he assisted in a study of the feasibility of using geothermal effluent to create wetlands for waterfowl. Mr. Haislip worked on several hydroelectric projects requiring an inventory and assessment of wetlands and mitigation plans to replace lost wetlands. On several other projects, such as irrigation developments, wastewater treatment facilities, and salinity control programs, he investigated potential impacts to wetlands and developed measures to minimize or eliminate losses of wetland resources. Education M.S., Ecology, University of Oklahoma B.S., Zoology, Texas Christian University USRI6DOB.DOC A-6 Richard E. Moos Senior Ecologist Distinguishing Qualifications • Managed multidisciplinary studies for impact assessment, remedial action risk assessment, mitigation, and monitoring • Principal investigator and primary author of numerous environmental reports • Capabilities in both management and scientific endeavors Relevant Experience Dr. Moos is a project manager and senior ecologist at CH2M HILL with extensive experience in hazardous waste management, environmental assessment, aquatic ecology, and water quality projects. His responsibilities include designing and managing multidisciplinary studies for impact assessment, remedial action risk assessment, mitigation, and monitoring. Dr. Moos has a wide range of experience on hazardous waste projects. He was the onsite field operations manager for a multidisciplinary site investigation of DOE's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This site investigation at an operating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility included extensive drilling and monitoring well installation; management of mixed wastes; sampling of groundwater, surface water, sediments, soil, and biota; and ecological surveys in an adjacent state wildlife management area. The integrated field operations team included geologists and hydrologists, geotechnical and environmental engineers, health physicists, ecologists, and specialists in sample waste management. As a senior ecologist and task manager, Dr. Moos has managed and been principal author of several ecological risk assessments at DOE and military facilities. He recently completed a risk assessment of the aquatic ecosystem at Waste Area Grouping 6 (WAG 6) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is currently conducting the ecological risk assessment at Operable Unit 3 at DOE's Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado. WAG 6 is an active waste disposal area at ORNL, and was previously used for disposal of both high- and low-level radioactive wastes, mixed wastes, laboratory solvents, metals, and various research and operational wastes. Operable Unit 3 is an approximately 10 -square -mile offsite area that is downwind and downgradient of the nuclear weapons facility. The risk assessment addressed the potential impact of plutonium, americium, uranium, and selected metals and herbicides on both the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Dr. Moos is also currently working on ecological risk assessments at several military installations, including Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska and Camp Pendleton and El Toro Marine Corps Bases in California. Dr. Moos was part of a 6 -person team that reviewed the environmental monitoring programs at five operating DOE facilities: the Gaseous Diffusion Plants in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio and the K-12 and ORNL facilities at Oak Ridge. The team reviewed the existing operational monitoring programs related to air, groundwater, surface water, soil, and human and biological receptors at all five facilities. The monitoring plans were checked for compliance with state and federal regulations and DOE orders and for uniformity of USRI6DOB.DOC A-7 methods and data management among the five facilities. The final report made several recommendations to improve the integration of chemical, radiological, and biological components to meet regulatory requirements. Dr. Moos has managed or was principal author of several environmental impact assess- ments for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) projects. He recently completed a draft environmental assessment for a proposed diversion canal around Standley Lake, the water supply reservoir for the cities of Westminster, Thornton, Northglenn, and Federal Heights. This high-profile project is immediately downstream of DOE's Rocky Flats Plant in Colorado and is being done in close coordination with the DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Moos continues to provide environmental services to the cities and is currently developing approaches for an ecological risk assessment and a biological assessment to meet DOE, EPA, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service requirements. Dr. Moos has managed environmental assessments (EAs) for an industrial wastewater discharge into the Great Salt Lake near Ogden, Utah; a proposed sprinkler irrigation development in Wyoming along the North Platte River that addressed water withdrawal impacts on fisheries and threatened and endangered bird species in the Platte river; and surface water, groundwater, and critical wildlife habitat issues for a wastewater collection and treatment system on the lower Colorado River. Dr. Moos has extensive experience on both Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and NEPA projects, and has been involved in the integration of CERCLA and NEPA documents for remedial response activities at DOE facilities in Colorado and Kentucky. Dr. Moos' project experience includes work on several large river ecosystems including the Missouri, Mississippi, Hudson, and Colorado Rivers. Dr. Moos is frequently the project manager on one or more projects and an ecologist or environmental scientist on other concurrent projects, thereby maintaining active capabilities in both management and scientific endeavors. He has managed projects ranging from small permitting assistant services to multiyear environmental impact assessments and RI/FS projects. Dr. Moos has been the principal investigator and primary author of numerous environmental reports, ranging from brief technical memos to multidiscipline, multivolume EAs. As project manager, technical director, or senior ecologist, Dr. Moos has been involved with data management and interpretation of large databases, preparation and production of multivolume environmental reports, design and implementation of multiphase environmental sampling programs, development of conceptual designs, and negotiations with federal, state, and municipal government agencies. Education Ph.D., Zoology, University of South Dakota M. S., Zoology/ Botany, University of South Dakota B. S., Biology/General Science, Montana State University Professional Certification Certified Fisheries Scientist, American Fisheries Society USR 16DOB.DOC A•8 Roger W. Ovink Fisheries Scientist Distinguishing Qualifications • Expertise in anadromous and resident fisheries biology; environmental permitting; ecological and human health risk assessment; water quality compliance issues; river and lake ecology; and endangered species biological assessments • Knowledgeable about the potential effects of waterway development, water uses, and wastewater/stormwater disposal on aquatic resources Certified in in -stream flow methodologies (IFIM) data collection, analysis, and interpretation Relevant Experience Mr. Ovink was coordinator of the CH2M HILL's Applied Ecology group in Corvallis. He is a certified fisheries scientist who specializes in aquatic studies and assessments. His research experience includes studies throughout the continental United States and Alaska. He has expertise in anadromous and resident fisheries biology; environmental permitting; ecological and human health risk assessment; water quality compliance issues; river and lake ecology; and endangered species biological assessments. Mr. Ovink has been involved with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund program since 1984. He has conducted qualitative and quantitative human health and ecological risk assessments for hazardous waste sites in Oregon, Missouri, Texas, California, Michigan, Wisconsin, Washington, Alaska, Idaho, and Montana. His involvement in these projects has included study design, sample collection, biomonitoring, data analysis, human and wildlife exposure assessments, bioassay testing, wildlife bioaccumulation analyses, risk quantification, remedial action development, and applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) evaluations. Mr. Ovink is very knowledgeable about the potential effects of waterway development, water uses, and wastewater/stormwater disposal on aquatic resources. He has conducted studies concerning the potential effects of port expansions, highway improvements, power and pipeline installations, water diversions, hydroelectric developments, municipal/ industrial wastewater outfalls, land uses, and water impoundments on resident and anadromous fishery resources, endangered species, and water quality. Mr. Ovink's work requires cooperation and coordination with local, state, and federal resource agencies to evaluate aquatic impacts and develop appropriate mitigative measures. Mr. Ovink has conducted environmental studies for several Indian Tribes in the Pacific Northwest. As a project biologist, he worked with the Siletz Indian Tribe to identify and secure lands for its reservation in western Oregon. He conducted water quality and fisheries investigations for the Tulalip Indian Tribe in Washington, aiding in its development of an anadromous fish hatchery. He also worked with the Warm Springs Tribes in central Oregon, where he documented the status of the salmon and steelhead resource of reservation streams and recommended actions to protect and enhance that resource. USR 16DOB.DOC A-9 Mr. Ovink was task leader in charge of information gathering and writing for the historical and current fisheries problems in the Klamath Basin. He also managed follow-up, basinwide public meetings to discuss the results of previous studies and implications of the current study recommendations. Previous studies addressed the problems of reduced anadromous fish habitat in various parts of the basin and increased harvests of anadromous fish stocks. The main objectives of the project were to identify, evaluate, and rank actions to rebuild the anadromous fish stocks and to provide background and direction for legislative bodies and agencies to make decisions on funding allocations, resource use, and fisheries management in the Klamath Basin. Mr. Ovink worked on numerous projects concerning the impacts of municipal develop- ments on aquatic resources. Data collected on the Carson River in northern Nevada provided information concerning the possible need for additional treatment of wastewater from a housing development to protect the fishery resource of the river. Data collected for several streams near Lincoln City, Oregon, were important in expanding the municipal water supply so that no significant impact to game fish populations would occur. His work on Cow Creek and the South Umpqua River in Douglas County, Oregon, aided in the development of a municipal, industrial, and irrigation water storage reservoir that will not adversely affect the fisheries resource of the area. Mr. Ovink was certified by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in in -stream flow method- ologies (IFIM) data collection, analysis, and interpretation and has been involved in numerous in -stream flow studies. His experience in Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho includes IFIM and fishery assessment studies on many large rivers: the Snake, Salmon, and Payette Rivers in Idaho; the Nestucca, Hood, and Deschutes Rivers in Oregon; the Hamma Hamma, Columbia, and Skokomish Rivers in Washington; and the Klamath and Sacramento Rivers in California. In northern California, Mr. Ovink has worked extensively to identify the effects of logging and log storage on the water quality and fisheries of rivers and streams. This work involved river and stream assessments throughout northern California and required close coordina- tion with local, state and federal natural resource agencies. The information collected in this work was utilized in developing regulations to protect the fishery resource and water quality of northern California rivers and streams. Mr. Ovink has conducted human health risk assessments for a variety of Superfund sites, including Times Beach (Missouri), Purity Oil (California), and Pendleton Woolen Mills (Washington). These assessments addressed the risks associated with dioxin, pesticides, organic compounds, and metals. These studies involved site investigations, exposure assessments, risk determinations, emergency action needs evaluations, and site cleanup options. Mr. Ovink has conducted ecological risk assessments for numerous active and abandoned hazardous waste sites, including Teledyne Wah Chang (Oregon), Blackbird Mine (Idaho), Warm Springs Ponds (Montana), Iron Mountain Mine (California), and Times Beach (Missouri). These assessments have included site evaluations, potential receptor identifica- tion, exposure pathway evaluation, affected community analyses, ecological risk quantification, and site cleanup option analyses. USRI6DOB.DOC A-10 Education M.S., Fisheries Biology, Michigan State University B.A., Biology, Kalamazoo College Certifications Certified Open Water SCUBA Diver (NAUI) Certified Fisheries Scientist, American Fisheries Society USRI6DOB.DOC A-11 Darby C. Stapp Cultural Resources Specialist Distinguishing Qualifications • Task leader to rewrite the cultural resource plan for the Hanford Site • Coordinated environmental restoration projects to ensure preservation and protection of cultural resources at Hanford • Task leader for the Hanford Issues Management System, which was designed to identify sitewide problems affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of the Hanford mission Relevant Experience Mr. Stapp coordinated environmental restoration projects to ensure preservation and protection of cultural resources at Hanford and the active involvement of the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Yakima, and Wanapum Tribes. He also worked with the Wanapum People, the Yakima Indian Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe as a task leader to rewrite the cultural resource plan for the Hanford Site. Mr. Stapp was task leader for the Hanford Issues Management System, which was designed to identify sitewide problems affecting the effectiveness and efficiency of the Hanford mission, to ensure that the appropriate actions are being taken to solve the problems, and to monitor and report the progress of resolution activities. For the Hanford Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Schedule Optimization Project, Mr. Stapp served as project manager. The study was designed to identify areas that unnecessarily slow environmental restoration activities. He prepared a self-evaluation based on personal interviews with 35 individuals involved in the program (Phase 1); coordinated the preparation of a report presenting findings and recommendations of a panel of outside experts (Phase 2); and prepared an implementation plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland (Phase 3). Mr. Stapp was selected by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology to serve on the Hanford Advisory Board as an alternate for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Mr. Stapp was co -principal investigator for a Waste Technology Center LDRD—funded project designed to identify technological opportunities for enhancing the recycling of high- energy materials currently being landfilled. He organized a conference held at PNL in September 1993 to develop regional partnerships to focus on solving solid waste problems in the Pacific Northwest. Education Ph.D., American Civilization (Anthropology Track), University of Pennsylvania M. A., Anthropology/ Environmental Studies, University of Idaho M. A., American Civilization, University of Pennsylvania B. A., Anthropology/Geology, University of Denver USRI6DOB.DOC A-12 Robert E. Swope Senior Environmental Planner Distinguishing Qualifications • Managed the preparation of a master plan and an environmental impact statement for a proposed large-scale, mixed- use development of Columbia riverfront property in Richland, Washington • Developed a public improvements program to implement the City of Spokane's North Riverbank Urban Design Plan • Managed preparation of a number of NEPA environmental documents Relevant Experience Mr. Swope is a project manager with expertise in land use and socioeconomic analyses and extensive worldwide experience in environmental and social impact analyses. He has more than 20 years of experience as an urban and environmental planner. He serves as project manager and senior reviewer of large-scale multidisciplinary environmental, land use, transportation, and socioeconomic studies. Mr. Swope has a particularly strong background in management of transportation -related environmental impact statements prepared under Washington's State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidelines. He served as assistant project manager for the Columbia Basin irrigation expansion project for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. This project involved a proposed major diversion from the Grand Coulee reservoir. Issues included impacts on hydroelectric -generating capacity and fisheries and the socioeconomic impacts from increased agricultural production. Mr. Swope supervised the technical efforts of a multidisciplinary team of CH2M HILL and subconsultant professionals. He was responsible for the analysis of land use and social science elements of the environment. Mr. Swope managed the preparation of a master plan and an environmental impact state- ment for a proposed large-scale, mixed- use development of Columbia riverfront property in Richland, Washington, and the development of a public improvements program to implement the City of Spokane's North Riverbank Urban Design Plan. Mr. Swope managed preparation of a number of NEPA environmental documents prepared in accordance with Federal Highway Administration guidelines, including EISs for the proposed extension of SR 509 and the South Sea -Tac Airport access road in King County; the proposed replacement of the Twin Bridges crossing of the Yakima River in rural Benton County; and the redesign of the I-82/Yakima Avenue interchange in the City of Yakima. All three are highly controversial projects involving issues of land use, traffic flow, noise, property acquisition and relocation, water quality, wildlife and fishery habitat, wetlands, and socioeconomic impacts. Because of potential impacts on recreational facilities and historic structures, Section 4(f) evaluations are being prepared for the Yakima projects. USRI6DOB.DOC A-13 He led environmental planning for preparation of the SR 520 -SR 901 to SR 202 SEPA EIS. The SR 520 project was the first major roadway project developed under the King County Sensitive Areas Ordinance (SAO). Mr. Swope was responsible for coordinating efforts with WSDOT, King County, the City of Redmond, and project team members in order to meet the SAO requirements. Mr. Swope led environmental planning for preparation of a SEPA corridor -level environ- mental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed 5 -mile extension of Canyon Road in Pierce County. The EIS was intended to help Pierce County identify and reserve a preferred roadway corridor. Major issues in this analysis were impacts on wetlands, fish -bearing streams, floodplain, and surrounding residential and public uses. Mr. Swope gained 6 years of experience working on large-scale planning projects in the cities of Damman, Hail, and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. As chief planner and assistant project manager on these projects, he oversaw the land use and socioeconomic household surveys and was responsible for the analysis of the survey results and the preparation of related technical reports. He coordinated the efforts of a large technical staff in the preparation of both city and regional master plans and was responsible for the formulation of the demographic, land use, housing, and public facilities elements of those plans. Education M.S., Urban Planning, University of Arizona M.A., Latin American Studies, University of New Mexico B.A., Political Science, Pennsylvania State University Professional Registration American Institute of Certified Planners USRI6DOB.DOC A-14 Gene J. Wallace Senior Advisor Distinguishing Qualifications Manages CH2M HILL's Richland office, which provides services to Hanford 35 years of experience in business, contract management and business development in the private and public sectors Relevant Experience Mr. Wallace has 35 years of experience in business, contract management and business development in the private and public sectors. He has direct responsibility for administer- ing and managing divergent types of contracts and business operations, including client service, staff and team development, contract negotiations, cost estimates, cost/schedule control, and reporting. As a result of this diverse and extensive contract and business management experience, he has developed a proficiency in program management, business development, creative and effective proposals, contract administration, business manage- ment, budgeting, annual business planning, staff utilization, and (most importantly) client sensitivity and satisfaction. As area office manager of CH2M HILL's Richland office, Mr. Wallace is senior contract manager and senior consultant for projects managed through offices in Washington, Oregon, Hawaii, and Alaska. He administered contracts with the Battelle Environmental Management Office (EMO), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) -Richland, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Westinghouse, municipalities, and private sector clients. His contracting efforts include business development, task order development, negotiations, and compliance with contract terms and conditions. He is also responsible for ensuring cost/schedule control, project delivery, accruals, monthly financial and technical status reporting, and client satisfaction. Mr. Wallace manages a full-time staff of 10 professionals and 4 support staff and is responsible for marketing and business development, client service, recruiting personnel, general administration, accounting, contract management and reengineering initiatives. The Richland office's clientele includes Westinghouse Hanford, Battelle, Washington Public Power Supply, DOE -Richland, PNL, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Air Force, the COE, municipalities, and private sector clients. Mr. Wallace is senior contract administrator and deputy program manager for CH2M HILL's EMO program (remedial investigation/ feasibility study) with Battelle. He is responsible for task order development, negotiations of costs and fees, subcontract manage- ment, cost schedule control, reporting, project execution and delivery. He is also client service manager for Westinghouse and senior consultant for municipal and private clients. Before coming to CH2M HILL, Mr. Wallace managed an Alyeska Pipeline program to identify, purchase, and make operational an internationally leading oil spill response and cleanup equipment inventory. His responsibilities included market research, specification development, vendor coordination, coordination with federal and state agencies, USRIMOB.DOC A-15 procurement of the equipment, and property control. The project was completed 6 months ahead of schedule and $5 million under budget. Mr. Wallace has 15 years of experience in the defense and petroleum industries, where he managed contract departments handling more than $100 million in procurements annually. He served as contract administrator for numerous federally funded projects. Using state-of- the-art contracting methods and techniques, he secured several major systems at significant savings to the government/ client, including the F5 fighter (a forward-looking radar system), which was delivered ahead of schedule under an FFP contract using performance incentives; the F-111 fighter (a weapons management system); and the B-1 bomber (a nuclear explosion safe cockpit capsule). He also managed procurements for the space shuttle and other defense industry and NASA projects. Mr. Wallace managed contracts for the integrating and managing contractor. For the development of the Prudhoe Bay oil field, he oversaw the performance of the contractors providing the various systems and pump stations that collected crude oil from the wells and delivered it to the Trans -Alaska Pipeline. As a self-employed consultant, Mr. Wallace provided business and contract management services to construction contractors, law offices, small businesses, ARCO, Northrop, and Alyeska Pipeline. His responsibilities included research activities, client relations, and general business services. Education A.B.A., Fullerton College Business and Management Studies, UCLA Cerritos College, University of Alaska, Seminars USRI6DOB.DOC A-16